TEACHING AND LEARNING COMMUNICATION FOR DEVELOPMENT A perspective from Canada

  • Helen Hambly Odame

Abstract

When the television-viewing public in Canada finally decided who qualified as the “Greatest Canadian” they picked a man whose name is unknown outside of Canada. Unlike Winston Churchill or Ronald Reagan who topped the British and American lists respectively, Tommy Douglas was our national hero. Once considered a radical socialist, Douglas not only promoted but realized our most important social services in Canada including universal health care, pensions for senior citizens and mothers’ allowances. During an era preoccupied with the Soviet Union/USA struggle, Douglas also urged Canada to promote human rights and antiwar interventions globally. From the 1940s through to his death in 1986 his work was political as well as imminently practical. Canada, Tommy Douglas explained, had to be based on principles of civil liberty for all with an appreciation of its heritage of multiculturalism.

Author Biography

Helen Hambly Odame
Helen Hambly Odame holds a PhD from the Faculty of Environmental Studies at York University in Toronto. She joined the faculty of Capacity Development and Extension in the School of Environmental Design and Rural Development at the University of Guelph in 2003. Previously, Helen spent 14 years in international research and development work in Canada, the Netherlands and throughout sub-Saharan Africa. She coordinates the Snowden Program in Development Communication based at the University of Guelph, Canada.
Published
2006-02-01
Section
Articles